★ On Friendships

Wait But Why on the friendships you make as you grow up:

When you’re a kid, or in high school, or in college, you don’t really work too hard on your friend situation. Friends just kind of happen.

For a bunch of years, you’re in a certain life your parents chose for you, and so are other people, and none of you have that much on your plates, so friendships inevitably form. Then in college, you’re in the perfect friend-making environment, one that hits all three ingredients sociologists consider necessary for close friendships to develop: “proximity; repeated, unplanned interactions; and a setting that encourages people to let their guard down and confide in each other.” More friendships happen.

Maybe they’re the right friends, maybe they’re not really, but you don’t put that much thought into any of it—you’re more of a passive observer.

Once student life ends, the people in your life start to shake themselves into more distinct tiers.

If you ever wonder why your number of friends gets smaller the further away you get from college, this article nails it.

It’s not that easy to make friends anymore.

Sure, you’ll make new friends in the future—at work, through your spouse, through your kids—but you won’t get to that Tier 1 brothers level, or even to Tier 2, with very many of them, because people who meet as adults don’t tend to get through the 100+ long, lazy hangouts needed to reach a bond of that strength. As time goes on, you start to realize that the 20-year frenzy of not-especially-thought-through haphazard friend-making you just did was the critical process of you making most of your lifelong friends.

Working From Home

“The advantages to working from home are too great, and I’ve come to count on them too much to imagine ever giving them up. Alongside those blessings, however, there are also many challenges.”

I started working from home when I took on a new job. Daniel Jalkut has some great advice for those of us who work from home.

The History of the Sidekick

The Sidekick succeeded because it showed consumers how cool technology could be, that they could personalize a chunk of plastic and chips to make it their own, and ushered in an era of mobile computing for the masses. Say what you will about how fast its rising star burnt out, but the Sidekick is an important element in the link between cell phone and smartphone, technology and style.

No other phone got me as excited as the release of the Sidekick 3. It may be surprising that it wasn’t the iPhone. I remember seeing friends with the Sidekick 2 and being amazed. Seeing them chat with friends over AOL Instant Messenger with a cellphone blew my mind. Without knowing it at the time, I saw the future of communication and mobile computing.

So many of us wanted an iPhone before we knew we wanted one because we saw the future of connectivity in the Sidekick.

Indeed.